NORWALK — For the third day in a row, the temperature was headed toward the 90s — and it was still early. With the humidity thick and an official heatwave underway, a day trip seemed the perfect solution.

The Sheffield Island Lighthouse Tour — $25 per adult — offered by the Norwalk Seaport Association nicely fit the bill, with a three-hour tour out of South Norwalk and into the Long Island Sound.

As a native of Norwalk and a former boater, a trip to Sheffield Island was not something new, but one that would usually be done at breakneck speed once we cleared the “no wake” zone. This trip would prove to be different and a lot more relaxing.

After a short wait under the shade of a gazebo at the 4 North Water St. dock, we boarded the C.J. Toth Quest, a 45-foot catamaran. First Mate Andy Thane gave the group of about 18 of us quick instructions on how to use the life jackets, and Capt. Bill Zombon steered the boat away from the dock into the Norwalk River.

After a brief wait for the Stroffolino Bridge to open — it was just past high tide and though not a very large vessel, the CJ Toth would not have made it through — we were on our way into Norwalk Harbor.

More Information

Sheffield Island Lighthouse tours

Depart from 4 North Water St.

Parking lot on site. More parking available on the street and at the Maritime Garage

Tours are held May through September, but only on weekends during May, June and September

Summer ferry schedule:

Monday, Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Tuesday and Wednesday, 11 a.m.

Saturday, Sunday and holidays 11 a.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m.

Ticket prices:

Adults: $25; Ages 4-12: $15; Seniors: $20

Family of four (two adults, two children): $60

For more information and details on special cruises, visit www.seaport.org

During the leisurely ride through the harbor, Thane pointed out points of interest both on land and on the water, like the condominiums that were once the site of a wooden boat builder, his favorite place for lobster (Sono Seaport Seafood), and Tavern Island, once owned by Broadway producer Billy Rose.

Thane recounted how Rose, married seven times, had a statute built on the island for each of his wives. But, he said, once divorced, Rose would cut the head off the statue and throw it into the Sound, according to local lore.

Near Manreesa, the now decommissioned power plant, the captain slowed down even more and pulled closer to shore, allowing a bird’s eye view of some baby osprey, just weeks away from being able to fly off on their own.

As we made our way toward Sheffield Island, a group of youngsters in small sailboats crossed our path, part of a local country club’s sailing school.

After about 45 minutes on the water, the boat pulled up to the dock at Sheffield Island. It was 11:45 a.m., and the boat would be headed back around 1:15 p.m.

The cooling breezes felt while on the boat continued once on the island. There, you can take a walk along a nature trail, part of the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Sanctuary, or wander through the lighthouse, activated in 1868 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The lighthouse, in use for 34 years, was retired from service in 1902. Volunteers from the Norwalk Seaport Association maintain the lighthouse and grounds as a museum and nature preserve.

Inside the lighthouse, rooms on the first and second floor are decorated with period pieces of furniture and artwork for sale — including many paintings of the lighthouse itself — hangs on the walls. The third floor, which would afford a fantastic view of the Sound, is off-limits and still undergoing restoration.

Outside, picnic tables are scattered around, and there is a larger picnic pavilion under the shade of a tent. Visitors can pack their own lunch and their beverage of choice, or buy a hot dog, soda, water or snacks at a small concession stand.

There are restrooms — though no running water — and it can get a bit buggy. But don’t worry if you forgot to pack your bug spray — two buckets on a table at the concession stand are filled with bottles of insect repellant.

There’s a cornhole game for visitors to use, along with all kinds of balls to toss around, along with some frisbees.

But perhaps the best thing to do is to plop yourself down in one of the Adirondack chairs, sit back, and take in the water view. And that’s exactly what we did, after touring the lighthouse and eating our lunch.

The Seaport Association also offers various themed cruises, including a Wednesday night acoustic cruise and a Friday sunset cruise. Tickets are $25 for adults, the same price as the daytime lighthouse tour cruises.

Thursday nights are reserved for a clambake on the island, and those tickets are $65 or $79, depending on what entrée you choose.

The boat can also be rented for a private two-hour cruise.

The island itself can be rented for private events, but a three-hour day trip might be all you need to recharge during a hot summer day.

NORWALK — For the third day in a row, the temperature was headed toward the 90s — and it was still early. With the humidity thick and an official heatwave underway, a day trip seemed the perfect solution.

The Sheffield Island Lighthouse Tour — $25 per adult — offered by the Norwalk Seaport Association nicely fit the bill, with a three-hour tour out of South Norwalk and into the Long Island Sound.

As a native of Norwalk and a former boater, a trip to Sheffield Island was not something new, but one that would usually be done at breakneck speed once we cleared the “no wake” zone. This trip would prove to be different and a lot more relaxing.

After a short wait under the shade of a gazebo at the 4 North Water St. dock, we boarded the C.J. Toth Quest, a 45-foot catamaran. First Mate Andy Thane gave the group of about 18 of us quick instructions on how to use the life jackets, and Capt. Bill Zombar steered the boat away from the dock into the Norwalk River.

After a brief wait for the Stroffolino Bridge to open — it was just past high tide and though not a very large vessel, the CJ Toth would not have made it through — we were on our way into Norwalk Harbor.

During the leisurely ride through the harbor, Thane pointed out points of interest both on land and on the water, like the condominiums that were once the site of a wooden boat builder, his favorite place for lobster (Sono Seaport Seafood), and Tavern Island, once owned by Broadway producer Billy Rose.

Thane recounted how Rose, married seven times, had a statute built on the island for each of his wives. But, he said, once divorced, Rose would cut the head off the statue and throw it into the Sound, according to local lore.

Near Manreesa, the now decommissioned power plant, the captain slowed down even more and pulled closer to shore, allowing a bird’s eye view of some baby osprey, just weeks away from being able to fly off on their own.

As we made our way toward Sheffield Island, a group of youngsters in small sailboats crossed our path, part of a local country club’s sailing school.

After about 45 minutes on the water, the boat pulled up to the dock at Sheffield Island. It was 11:45 a.m., and the boat would be headed back around 1:15 p.m.

The cooling breezes felt while on the boat continued once on the island. There, you can take a walk along a nature trail, part of the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Sanctuary, or wander through the lighthouse, activated in 1868 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The lighthouse, in use for 34 years, was retired from service in 1902. Volunteers from the Norwalk Seaport Association maintain the lighthouse and grounds as a museum and nature preserve.

Inside the lighthouse, rooms on the first and second floor are decorated with period pieces of furniture and artwork for sale — including many paintings of the lighthouse itself — hangs on the walls. The third floor, which would afford a fantastic view of the Sound, is off-limits and still undergoing restoration.

Outside, picnic tables are scattered around, and there is a larger picnic pavilion under the shade of a tent. Visitors can pack their own lunch and their beverage of choice, or buy a hot dog, soda, water or snacks at a small concession stand.

There are restrooms — though no running water — and it can get a bit buggy. But don’t worry if you forgot to pack your bug spray — two buckets on a table at the concession stand are filled with bottles of insect repellant.

There’s a cornhole game for visitors to use, along with all kinds of balls to toss around, along with some frisbees.

But perhaps the best thing to do is to plop yourself down in one of the Adirondack chairs, sit back, and take in the water view. And that’s exactly what we did, after touring the lighthouse and eating our lunch.

The Seaport Association also offers various themed cruises, including a Wednesday night acoustic cruise and a Friday sunset cruise. Tickets are $25 for adults, the same price as the daytime lighthouse tour cruises.

Thursday nights are reserved for a clambake on the island, and those tickets are $65 or $79, depending on what entrée you choose.

The boat can also be rented for a private two-hour cruise.

The island itself can be rented for private events, but a three-hour day trip might be all you need to recharge during a hot summer day.