For Fairfield Ludlowe outfielder Tom Nagy, baseball comes easy.

Nagy compiled school records in home runs, slugging percentage and hits in his three year career as a Falcon. All of these accolades have earned Nagy a partial scholarship to play baseball at Fairfield University starting in 2011.

Nagy became a force in the Falcons' starting lineup beginning in 2009, but had a dominant year in 2010. Nagy batted .388 with seven home runs and 33 RBIs, playing in all of the Falcons' 26 games this past season and helping lift Ludlowe to the FCIAC Championship this year.

Nagy's improvement from his junior year to senior year is what caught the eye of Fairfield University Head Coach John Slosar.

"I was impressed with his improvement from last year to this year," Slosar said. "He made a lot more contact."

Ludlowe's Head Coach Keith O'Rourke also found that the transition from Nagy's junior to senior year is what defined his career at Fairfield Ludlowe.

"He went to a different level his senior year," O'Rourke said. "It's a tribute to his maturity and his upbringing."

Baseball is also in Nagy's genes as he is a cousin of former Major Leaguer and Fairfielder Charles Nagy. O'Rourke thinks part of his maturity, however, comes from his parents, Lisa and Ron, as well.

"They've done a great job of teaching him how to be responsible," O'Rourke said. "They've also instilled in him good values and ideals."

Nagy worked hard between his junior and senior years to make more contact, and it spurred on his success. Nagy struck out just 20 times in 89 at bats, and set a single season record with 38 hits. Nagy's seven home runs were a school record, and included a monster home run in the FCIAC championship against Greenwich.

Also Keying the transition between junior and senior seasons was Nagy getting his eyes examined and a commitment to balance. Nagy's better balance left him less suceptible to off-speed pitches this year.

"I worked hard this offseason," Nagy said after the FCIAC title game. "I got my eyes checked and it made all the difference."

Despite Nagy's success, Slosar considers Nagy's most difficult transition to be the one that he makes from high school baseball to Division I college baseball.

"There's a mental aspect involved," he said. "It's all about how he handles failure because there'll be more failure."

However, O'Rourke thinks that Nagy's personality and the culture of baseball at Fairfield Ludlowe should allow him to ease into the transition.

"Our high school program operates like a Division I program," O'Rourke said. "He played with Division I players."

Also in the mind of O'Rourke, playing close to home will aid Nagy's transition from high school to college baseball.

"I think he'll make the transition just fine," he said. "If he gets fatigued, he is right around the corner from his home."

Slosar has opened the opportunity for Nagy to start next year in the outfield for the Stags.

"There'll be an opportunity for him to start next year," he said. "It's just about how he makes the adjustment from high school to college."

O'Rourke understands the value of staying close to home. He started his college career at the University of Miami and found that less than inviting.

After transferring to Hofstra University, it allowed his family and friends to see him play. O'Rourke knows that Nagy

could benefit from not having to transfer to get that effect.

"Going away to college stunk," he said. "There's something to be said for having familiar

faces there when you're playing."

O'Rourke is also excited for him and his kids to be able to go see Nagy play in college at some point next year.

"It's exciting to be able to hop in the car in see what one of your former

players is doing," O'Rourke said. "I'm

excited for [Tom] and for his family."