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Monday, December 22, 2014

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Penfield repairs among three Fairfield projects sharing $1.1M in Sandy grants

Published 3:48 pm, Tuesday, July 1, 2014
  • The town has received a $500,000 state grant to help pay for repairs to the Penfield Pavilion Photo: Genevieve Reilly / Fairfield Citizen
    The town has received a $500,000 state grant to help pay for repairs to the Penfield Pavilion Photo: Genevieve Reilly

 

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Three state grants totaling more than $1.1 million were awarded to Fairfield this week to help repair and upgrade public infrastructure damaged by Superstorm Sandy.

The grants, announced by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, are being allocated among overall grants of nearly $32 million statewide to communities affected by the October 2012 storm.

- $500,000 for Penfield Pavilion repairs: The grant for the beachfront pavilion, which remains closed because of extensive damage caused by the storm surge, will be used to help pay for repairs to structural components and utilities, as well as raise the building above the 100-year base flood elevation, according to the state's announcement.

- $560,000 for upgrading the Pine Creek culvert: The project includes upsizing the 48-inch culvert under Pine Creek dike to twin 60-inch pipes and sluice gates, plus adding a new 48-inch pipe and a self-regulating tide gate. The culverts help to drain a 310-acre area with approximately 1,187 residential units.

- $74,500 for the Water Pollution Control Authority's plant outfall pipe: The pipe repair is designed to prevent future leaks and clear a flow restriction that was a result of damage caused by Sandy. Repairs involve excavating to expose a damaged joint, and constructing a poured exterior concrete collar using bentonite water stops to structurally seal and immobilize the separated pipe joint.

"Given that extreme weather events like Sandy that were considered once-in-a-century events have now become annual occurrences, it's not a matter of if, but when that next storm will hit Connecticut's shoreline communities," Malloy said in a statement. "With these grants, we are not only helping these communities overcome the devastating impacts of one of the most severe storms in Connecticut's history, but we're also helping them to establish resiliency plans so they can be better prepared for future storms."