WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Archives on Thursday released more than 13,200 records — some hundreds of pages long — related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963.

It's the fourth release so far this year.

Most of the collection comprising about 5 million pages of records has been released to the public, but some documents have been withheld over the years to protect individuals, intelligence sources and methods and national security.

Photo: Ted Rozumalski, AP
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FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1963, file photo first lady Jackie Kennedy, President John F. Kennedy, Lady Bird and Vice President Lyndon Johnson attend a LULAC dinner in Houston. Newly released documents regarding FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1963, file photo first lady Jackie Kennedy, President John F. Kennedy, Lady Bird and Vice President Lyndon Johnson attend a LULAC dinner in Houston. Newly released documents regarding John F. Kennedy's assassination show the FBI was monitoring Latino civil rights groups weeks before the president would make history by visiting with one of the organizations. A memo released October 2017 said an FBI informant kept close watch on a Dallas chapter of the G.I. Forum, a moderate group of Mexican American veterans who spoke out against discrimination. (Ted Rozumaiski/Houston Chronicle via AP, File)
Photo: Cameron Johnson, AP
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This undated photo provided by RR Auction shows part of a manuscript penned by Jack Ruby, who shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald days after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The manuscript is up This undated photo provided by RR Auction shows part of a manuscript penned by Jack Ruby, who shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald days after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The manuscript is up for auction Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. A medallion worn by Kennedy at Harvard University is also up for auction. (Cameron Johnson/RR Auction via AP)
Photo: Cameron Johnson, AP
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This undated photo provided by RR Auction shows a medallion worn by John F. Kennedy at Harvard University, which will be up for auction Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. A manuscript penned by Jack Ruby, who shot and This undated photo provided by RR Auction shows a medallion worn by John F. Kennedy at Harvard University, which will be up for auction Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. A manuscript penned by Jack Ruby, who shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald days after the assassination of President, is also up for auction. (Cameron Johnson/RR Auction via AP)
Photo: Jon Elswick, AP
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Part of a file from the CIA, dated Oct. 10, 1963, details "a reliable and sensitive source in Mexico" report of Lee Harvey Oswald's contact with the Soviet Union embassy in Mexico City, that was released for Part of a file from the CIA, dated Oct. 10, 1963, details "a reliable and sensitive source in Mexico" report of Lee Harvey Oswald's contact with the Soviet Union embassy in Mexico City, that was released for the first time on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017, by the National Archives. Documents show U.S. officials scrambling after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy to round up information about Lee Harvey Oswald's trip to Mexico City weeks earlier.
Photo: Mary Altaffer, AP
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FILE - This May 1, 2013, file photo, taken at JFK airport in New York shows a first class seat set up for a passenger's meal in American Airlines' new Boeing 777-300ER airplane. Conventional wisdom holds that FILE - This May 1, 2013, file photo, taken at JFK airport in New York shows a first class seat set up for a passenger's meal in American Airlines' new Boeing 777-300ER airplane. Conventional wisdom holds that free seat upgrades are reserved for frequent flyers and other passengers with elite status, but there's another school of thought that contends how you dress and how you behave can occasionally result in a magical move from the back of the plane to the front.
Photo: Jon Elswick, AP
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Part of a file, dated Nov. 24, 1963, quoting FBI director J. Edgar Hoover as he talks about the death of Lee Harvey Oswald, released for the first time on Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017, is photographed in Part of a file, dated Nov. 24, 1963, quoting FBI director J. Edgar Hoover as he talks about the death of Lee Harvey Oswald, released for the first time on Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017, is photographed in Washington. The public is getting a look at thousands of secret government files related to President John F. Kennedy's assassination, but hundreds of other documents will remain under wraps for now. The government was required by Thursday to release the final batch of files related to Kennedy's assassination in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. But President Donald Trump delayed the release of some of the files, citing security concerns.
Photo: Jon Elswick, AP
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Esta foto tomada en Washington muestra parte de un documento, fechado el 24 de noviembre de 1963, en el que se cita al director del FBI en esa época, J. Edgar Hoover, mientras habla sobre la muerte de Lee Esta foto tomada en Washington muestra parte de un documento, fechado el 24 de noviembre de 1963, en el que se cita al director del FBI en esa época, J. Edgar Hoover, mientras habla sobre la muerte de Lee Harvey Oswald, el francotirador que mató al presidente John F. Kennedy. El documento fue divulgado por primera vez el jueves 26 de octubre del 2017. (AP Foto/Jon Elswick)
Photo: Anonymous, AP
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This image provided by the Warren Commission is an overhead view of President John F. Kennedy's car in Dallas motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963, and was the commission's Exhibit No. 698. Special agent Clinton J. Hill This image provided by the Warren Commission is an overhead view of President John F. Kennedy's car in Dallas motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963, and was the commission's Exhibit No. 698. Special agent Clinton J. Hill is shown riding atop the rear of the limousine. President Donald Trump is caught in a push-pull on new details of Kennedy’s assassination, jammed between students of the killing who want every scrap of information and intelligence agencies that are said to be counseling restraint. Some 2,800 other files on the assassination have now been made public, and they capture the frantic days following the Nov. 22, 1963 assassination.(Warren Commission via AP)
Photo: Anonymous, AP
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This image provided by the Warren commission, shows Warren Commission Exhibit No. 697, President John F. Kennedy at the extreme right on rear seat of his limousine during Dallas, motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963. His This image provided by the Warren commission, shows Warren Commission Exhibit No. 697, President John F. Kennedy at the extreme right on rear seat of his limousine during Dallas, motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963. His wife, Jacqueline, beside him, Gov. John Connally of Texas and his wife were on jump seats in front of the president. President Donald Trump is caught in a push-pull on new details of Kennedy’s assassination, jammed between students of the killing who want every scrap of information and intelligence agencies that are said to be counseling restraint. How that plays out should be known on Oct. 26, 2017, when long-secret files are expected to be released. (Warren Commission via AP)
Photo: AP
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This Nov. 22, 1963, file photo shows an Associated Press "A" wire copy edited for the teletypesetter circuit, reporting on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas. President Donald Trump has This Nov. 22, 1963, file photo shows an Associated Press "A" wire copy edited for the teletypesetter circuit, reporting on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas. President Donald Trump has blocked the release of hundreds of records on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, bending to CIA and FBI appeals, while the National Archives came out Thursday, Oct. 17, 2017 with a hefty cache of others. Some 2,800 other files on the assassination have now been made public, and they capture the frantic days following the Nov. 22, 1963 assassination.
Photo: Jim Altgens, AP
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FILE - In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy waves from his car in a motorcade in Dallas. Riding with Kennedy are First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, second from left, FILE - In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy waves from his car in a motorcade in Dallas. Riding with Kennedy are First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, second from left, and her husband, Texas Gov. John Connally, far left. The National Archives released the John F. Kennedy assassination files on Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017.
Photo: Anonymous, AP
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This image provided by the Warren Commission is an overhead view of President John F. Kennedy's car in Dallas motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963, and was the commission's Exhibit No. 698. Special agent Clinton J. Hill This image provided by the Warren Commission is an overhead view of President John F. Kennedy's car in Dallas motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963, and was the commission's Exhibit No. 698. Special agent Clinton J. Hill is shown riding atop the rear of the limousine. President Donald Trump is caught in a push-pull on new details of Kennedy’s assassination, jammed between students of the killing who want every scrap of information and intelligence agencies that are said to be counseling restraint. How that plays out should be known on Oct. 26, 2017, when long-secret files are expected to be released. (Warren Commission via AP)

The latest documents are being released according to a law that President George H.W. Bush signed Oct. 26, 1992. That law required all records related to the assassination be released within 25 years, unless the president says doing so would harm intelligence, law enforcement, military operations or foreign relations.

Last month, on the 25-year deadline, President Donald Trump wrote in a memorandum that he had "no choice" but to agree to requests from some government agencies to continue withholding certain information.

Trump, however, directed agencies to again review each of their redactions during the next 180 days. He said agency heads needed to be extremely circumspect in recommending that information still needed to be withheld from the public.

Government agencies have until March to tell the National Archives why any part of their records should still be redacted. The records included in this latest public release have not yet been re-reviewed by the agencies as part of that process.

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