‘Falcons of the Month’ cited at Ludlowe High

Sixteen students at Fairfield Ludlowe High School were selected as “Falcons of the Month” for April.

The students chosen for the citation were nominated by school staff and students on the basis of those “who pursued a goal and succeeded,” according to the announcement.

Those selected include: Andrew Hevita, Peter Stack, Henry Prestegaard, Kate Sullivan, Hannah Sharpe, Nate Roberts, Tamsin Brenner, Kevin Wheeler, Owen Granberg and Erick Espinal IV.

Also, Alexander Poulter, Jeff Meyers, Nicole Pierpont, Natalie Nadolny, Julio Morales and Peter Gallagher.

Town spelling bee sponsored by Fairfield Junior Women

The 34th annual Townwide Spelling Bee for fifth-graders will be sponsored Monday by the Fairfield Junior Women’s Club.

The spelling competition, featuring 35 classroom champions from local elementary schools, will take place at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Roger Ludlowe Middle School, 689 Unquowa Road.

This year’s judges include Helene Murtha, head of children's services for the Fairfield Public Library; Andrea Canuel, assistant director of volunteer programs and service learning at Sacred Heart University, and John Kovach, editorial director for the HAN Network.

To learn more about the Fairfield Junior Women’s Club, visit www.jwcfairfield.com.

‘Gin & Jazz’ celebrates Fairfield Museum photo exhibits

A “Gin & Jazz” theme added fizz to the recent opening reception for a new photo exhibit at the Fairfield Museum and History Center.

The exhibit, “Connecticut, 1940: Farms, Factories and the Photographs of Jack Delano,” runs through Sept. 18 at the museum, 370 Beach Road.

The event also featured the presentation of top awards in the museum’s juried photography show, “IMAGES 2016,” which is on display at the museum through June 27.

The winners were: Carol M. Battin, for her photo “Dead Sea Reflection,” in the professional/serious amateur category, and Justin Feldman, for “Old Glory,” in the student category. Battin, with her prize, will get to have a solo exhibition at Southport Galleries, while Feldman will have the opportunity to work with Philip Trager, a noted photographer of architecture and dance, for a portfolio review.

In addition to refreshments, the event featured an auction to benefit the museum’s education programming that supports field trips for “underserved students from Norwalk and Bridgeport.”

For more information about both photo exhibitions, visit http://www.fairfieldhistory.org.

Bigelow Tea builds patio at senior center

A new patio is planned at the town’s senior center, with help from the center’s namesake benefactor, Fairfield-based Bigelow Tea.

The 10-by15-foot patio, which will be built as an extension of the walkway between the gazebo and front entrance, will be used for outdoor seatings for events like picnics and concerts.

The patio is made possible, in part, by a donation from the annual Bigelow Tea Community Challenge, the company’s annual fundraising races in September.

Cindi Bigelow, the president and CEO of Bigelow Tea, said in a statement announcing the donation, “Working to help provide a cheerful environment and variety of programs has always had special meaning to me. The new patio promises to further expand the services that our seniors have come to enjoy.”

Future plans include landscaping around the patio area and a paver walkway that will include a memorial “donate-a-brick” feature.

To learn more about Bigelow Center for Senior Activities and its programs, visit www.fairfieldct.org/bigelowcenter.

Local gardens showcased on Hidden Garden Tour

The 25th annual Hidden Garden Tour organized by the Westport Historical Society for June 12 will include visits to private gardens in Fairfield.

The event will showcase gardens in the Greenfield Hill and Southport sections of town, as well as gardens in Westport. It is planned from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Eash of the six gardens on the tours “has been carefully selected in honor of this 25th anniversary of the Hidden Garden Tour,” Edward F. Gerber, event chairman, said in historical society publicity for the tour. Several of the gardens were feature on tours in the 2000s, and are being featured again by popular demand to show how they evolved, according to organizers.

Among the tour highlights, according to the historical society, will be:

a historic property featuring an axial border planting of perennials and herbaceous plants, a rose garden, apple orchard and a squatter’s garden where friends are encouraged to grow vegetables.

a walled rose garden with a surviving American Elm overlooking Southport Harbor

a garden with three rock outcroppings, woodland garden and pathways, a raspberry patch and greenhouse.

a “breathtaking” property on Long Island Sound.

On tour day, there will also be a garden market, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., on the Westport Historical Society’s Wheeler House, 25 Avery Place. An variety of crafts, clothing, jewelry, antiques and hand-crafted accessories for the home and garden will be on sale. Admission is free.

The Garden Party on June 10 kicks off the weekend, with a social gathering from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Westport Woman’s Club on Imperial Avenue.

Tickets for the Hidden Garden Tour cost $60 in advance, $70 on the day of the tour. Garden Party tickets are $100 in advance, $125 after June 8. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.westporthistory.org or call 203-222-1424.

NDHS Class of ’75 plans reunion

The reunion of Notre Dame High School’s Class of 1975 is planned June 3.

Events will include a golf outing from noon to 4 p.m. at Fairchild Wheeler Golf Course, followed by a reunion gathering, from 7-11:30 p.m., at Vazzy's 19th Hole at the golf course.

More events for the class are planned for the month of June. For more information, contact Mike Doyle at dmikedebs@aol.com.