FAIRFIELD — Despite the machinations at the state capitol over the budget, things went a bit more smoothly on the local level this year.

Budgeting with an eye toward the worst case scenario as far as revenue from the state, most elected officials considered the $305 million municipal spending plan to be on the lean side. In fact, with the exception of some minor adjustments along the way, the budget proposed by First Selectman Mike Tetreau remained relatively untouched.

The result was a speedy, 17-minute Representative Town Meeting approval, with just four people casting a “no” vote.

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Elected officials and their tax bills

The old property tax bill is in parantheses

Selectman Kevin Kiley, Steiner Street, $10,021 ($9,814)

Selectman Chris Tymniak, Old Mill Road, $11,776 ($11,534)

Board of Finance Chairman Thomas Flynn, Coral Road, $10,015 ($9,732)

Board of Education Chairman Phil Dwyer , Congress Street, $12,654 ($12,395)

RTM Moderator Phil Pires, Stoneleigh Road, $10,084 ($9,877)

RTM Majority Leader Karen Wackerman, Shoreham Village Drive, $8,569 ($8, 393)

RTM Deputy Majority Leader Jill Vergara, Old Post Road, $11,753 ($11,513)

RTM Minority Leader Pam Iacono, Phyfe Road, $12,025 ($11,778)

RTM Deputy Minority Leader Michael Herley, Gray Rock Road, $13,875 ($13,591)

Democratic Town Committee Chairman Steve Sheinberg, Flax Road, $8,176 ($8,008)

Republican Town Committee Chairman James Millington, Unquowa Road, $5,542 ($5,429)

After the budget was approved by the selectmen, the Board of Finance and the the RTM, it was now up to the finance board to set a mill rate that would determine residents’ tax bill. Thanks to slightly more state revenue than was budgeted for, the board last week adopted a tax rate of 26.36 mills, a 2.09 percent increase over the current 25.82 rate. Initially, it was expected the new tax rate would be 26.43, a 2.36 percent increase.

For a homeowner with property assessed at $300,000, that would mean the tax bill would increase $162 from $7,746 to $7,908. On a home assessed at $500,000, the tax bill would increase $270 from $12,910 to $13,180.

Taxes are based on the assessed value, which is 70 percent of the fair market value determined during the most recent revaluation year. Tax rates are expressed in mills, or thousandths of a dollar. A mill rate of 26.36 results in a tax payment of $26.36 for each $1,000 of assessed value.

How does the new tax rate affect those elected officials who vote on the budget? We put together a list of elected officials and party leaders, showing their old and new tax bills. Tetreau is not included in the list because he does not own any real estate in town.