This week the Fairfield Museum is presenting to the public a variety of objects and research collected over the past two years in Southport related to the Battle of Pequot (Munnacommock) Swamp, which took place there nearly 400 years ago. The Museum was awarded a National Parks Services grant as part of the American Battlefield Protection Program, and the grant was used to work with archeologists from the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center to scour the area for possible information related to the battle.

The Pequot Swamp Battle was the last major battle in the Pequot War, a fight between Pequot and English Allied forces, which took place from July 13 to July 14, 1637. The goal of the project was to locate and document battlefield activity associated with the 24-hour battle. After working in yards, parks and woodsy areas in Southport, more than 250 objects were found, many of which were deemed to be battlefield-related.

The objects included many musket balls. The locations and patterns of the balls were able to give the researchers insight into what exactly took place during the battle. Dr. David Naumec will be at the Fairfield Museum on Thursday, Oct. 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. to discuss the archaeological survey and its significance. Naumec is military historian and archaeologist who has worked with Battlefields of the Pequot War project since 2007. Currently he is an assistant Professor of History at Eastern Connecticut University, as well as an adjunct History Instructor at Three Rivers Community College.

Naumec will also bring a selection of the original artifacts recovered from the battle to this exciting “Museum After Dark” talk. The event is open to the public, and takes place at the Fairfield Museum (370 Beach Road). Those who cannot attend can access the full report online at Fairfieldhistory.org/library-collections/pequot/.

The Fairfield Museum & History Center and Museum Shop, located at 370 Beach Road, is open seven days a week, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Members of the Museum and children under 5 are admitted free. For more information, call 203-259-1598 or visit Fairfieldhistory.org.