Camillo: Greenwich COVID numbers show signs of stabilizing

Photo of Ken Borsuk
Jim Anderson, a member of the GEMS vaccination team, preps a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Town of Greenwich vaccination clinic at Town Hall last month. Greenwich Hospital says it has more appointments being filled than last week and the hope is more supply will come again next week.

Jim Anderson, a member of the GEMS vaccination team, preps a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Town of Greenwich vaccination clinic at Town Hall last month. Greenwich Hospital says it has more appointments being filled than last week and the hope is more supply will come again next week.

File / Tyler Sizemore / Hearst Connecticut Media

GREENWICH — Greenwich’s numbers for COVID-19 are showing signs of stabilization, a trend that appears to be happening statewide, according to local officials.

There are 185 residents with the coronavirus whose cases are considered active by the town Department of Health, down 42 case from the week before, First Selectman Fred Camillo said Wednesday. Overall, 3,801 residents have been diagnosed with COVID since the pandemic began 11 months ago. That’s an increase of 157 local cases from last week. Also, 81 residents have died who were diagnosed with the coronavirus.

Those numbers are in line with the consistency shown in the cases at Greenwich Hospital.

“The good news is that number is starting to come down,” said Diane Kelly, hospital president.

There were 30 patients hospitalized with coronavirus as of Wednesday, which is down five from last week, she said. And three were in the intensive care unit, she said.

“When we can manage patients on the general medical floor it’s far better for those patients obviously,” Kelly said.

Overall in the Yale New Haven Health System, of which Greenwich Hospital is a part, there were 218 patients admitted with COVID, a decrease from 295 last week in the five hospitals.

“I think it is really good for us to look at it across the system so we can start to feel that we are starting to make a dent in this,” Kelly said.

Since last week, the state opened up vaccinations to residents 65 and over. Greenwich Hospital continues to operate two vaccine clinics in town. The Department of Health is operating a clinic at Town Hall and Family Centers Inc. is running one at the Eastern Greenwich Civic Center.

More than 3,300 people have been vaccinated at Greenwich Hospital’s clinic at the Brunswick School King Street campus, said Dana Marnane, vice president of public relations at the hospital.

Their clinics in town are expected to continue to be “very busy,” Kelly said, with Greenwich Hospital vaccinating 750 people a day over the next several days.

Across the health system, Kelly said Yale New Haven has delivered 81,000 vaccines, which she called “pretty amazing.”

Further expansion of the vaccine program is expected in the coming weeks to accommodate frontline essential workers and people younger than 65 with underlying medical conditions. The state has not released information about who will be included in the essential worker category.

The town will begin outreach soon to persuade residents who are eligible to get the vaccine, Camillo said. But right now, he said the demand is there for the limited supply of vaccine doses that the town is receiving from the state.

“Every time I turn around someone is asking me, ‘Hey, when can I get it? When can I get it’?” Camillo said. “We’re not there yet. If there was a lot of supply here and not a big rush to get vaccinated, it would absolutely be front and center. ... Right now, it’s a little bit ahead of ourselves with the supply lagging the demand.”

The state receives its supply from the federal government, with more expected starting next week, Gov. Ned Lamont said.

The doses are all put to use, noting that about 250 vaccines were administered each day at Brunswick last week, Kelly said, and they are now up to 750 doses a day.

“We definitely are getting more supplies when available,” she said. “Is that a predictor for the certainty of the future? No.”

Yale New Haven Health System had been expanding its outreach in the state, particularly to people of color to get vaccinated, Kelly said.

“We have done a lot of general communication,” she said. “I was participating in that here in Greenwich, and I know my partners in other parts of the system have worked with their local communities. We’re very open to being part of that conversation. It’s extremely important.”

kborsuk@greenwichtime.com